Friday, 17 July 2020

lock join plus

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Many months back, in response to some curiosity and confusion among several tatters, I decided to illustrate the simple progression and functional similarity between a few techniques. Here the underlying common factor is the ubiquitous Lock Join. Add one extra step to the LJ, and it opens up the canvas to change colours, shuttles, and even direction of chains.
I took stepwise pics for each of the combinations back then, but preparing a proper stream-lined article has taken way more time than intended. I am immensely grateful to Anita Barry, Master Tatter, for her proofing and editing.

In order to make the document manageable, it is uploaded as a series of 5 pdfs, each a stand-alone (click on each title to download) –

  1. Lock Join Plus – Executive Summary and practice Patterns for further exploration. (3 pages)
 
How one extra movement after a lock join can open up the canvas to change colours, shuttles, and even direction of chains. 

For starters, a simple 2-colour motif is used where all chains face the same direction. But for further exploration, more patterns are listed. 

  1. LJ Plus - Lock Join (LJ) pictorial (1 page)
 
How to make the lock join using both up and down loops. 

Notice how the colour blips in the 2 right joins are larger than the remaining 3. If the down loop LJ is followed by a 2nd half-stitch, the blip is almost hidden completely.
Links to undo a LJ and variations that include making a LJ with 2nd shuttle.
See also Lock Join in Mock Rings


  1. LJ Plus – Reposition pictorial (1 page)
 
A laissez-faire crossing of threads. Simple, quick, vintage. Compare how chain segments change colour and the slight overlap at the start of each chain.

  1. LJ Plus - Shoe Lace Trick (SLT) pictorial (1 page)
 
Tying a half knot outside the LJ – overhand tie or SLT. Again chain colours get switched. SLT also allows us to switch the core thread in instances when the shuttle is running low on thread.

  1. LJ Plus – Reverse Join (RJ) pictorial (2 pages)
 
Encapsulating or entrapping the other thread within the LJ. Created by Elaine P Gan (tattingbox). 

Pics showing an up loop and a down loop. The latter 
minimises the colour blip in a RJ as well.

Functionally the same as crossing and SLT after LJ, but more elegant and efficient – a smooth transition.





After each or either of these, if we turn work, reverse work, switch shuttle, and/or direct tat (unflipped stitches) the next chain, we add another dimension – changing the direction of the chain! Along with colour. Our choices multiply! And we might even be able to work throughout with just one shuttle and ball. To explore these choices, some practice patterns are listed in the main pdf. Besides block tatting, think also of filet tatting, especially in 2 colours, where these can be used effectively. I forgot to mention the role of lock join plus in mock rings and mock onion rings, but you get the idea, right? Wherever you have 1 or more chains joined below, play with LJ Plus!
I used all the above 4 in this vintage edging from Priscilla Tatting Book3 Fig 29 where the chains move to and fro. We can turn work after each chain or we can work every alternate chain directly (reverse stitch - unflipped). I started with LJ, then tried reposition, SLT, and RJ after every 3rd chain. Shuttle in hand changes depending on our choices.

So I'm sure there is no need to spell out why I presented this article/pdfs in the way I did? There is lot of scope to play and design because each method has it's own pluses and minuses!
Do you see a butterfly in the above arrangement? Time to pick up my shuttles again and work out a pattern ;-D
Before that you might get fed one more lesson, so stay locked in ;-P

28 comments:

  1. At any level one continues to learn. I would have loved learning this about Lock Joins as a beginner/intermediate tatter. But, I’m reading it now. And, the article with diagrams add clarity!😁Good to read this! Well organized Muskaan!

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    1. means so much coming from you, Anita :-))) Thanks for your joyful support <3

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  2. I hope you know how much your clear and thorough explanations are appreciated. Another « pin » for me here! Thank you!

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    1. and you wouldn't believe how much I appreciate your words, Michelle! I felt lost last week wondering whether it was even helpful, and was just about ready to call off all my work. Thanks to a couple of my friends who picked me up :-)))

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  3. This is very thorough muskaan and there's a lot of work here, thank you! I don't know the reverse join at all, very interesting.

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    1. Thanks, Jane, but there's more to come ;-P
      I have used the RJ frequently and usually mention it in my posts. It has made life easy since you know I don't much care for the SLT ;-P

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    2. I learned Reverse Join from Elaine P. Gan. She uses it frequently in her designs. ;)

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    3. You are absolutely right, Sue :-))) I put her name and link to her blog in the pdf. I often mention her in my posts, but forgot to add it here :-( Let me update ...

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  4. Can we add 2 types of beaded lock join?

    1. Pull the loop through the bead then the picot then back through the bead. This places the bead between the lines of tatting
    2. Pull the loop up through the picot, then the bead and take up slack. This places the bead on top of the tatting

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    1. Vicki, wow, you taught me something new! Tried them, and love the effects! Will certainly include them in my next part ...hubby had accidentally deleted all 29 pics and I've had to rephotograph the entire pictorial. So your suggestion is well-timed, and it also reminded me of my own Raised Beads alternative using lock join ;-D
      Oh, and should I credit you or is there another source for the 2 methods?

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    2. I don't know, I just do them lol so not sure the source... everything I know about beaded tatting comes from Nina Libnin so maybe blame her?

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    3. 😉😄 I've just written to Nina Libin, asking for confirmation and permission, Vicki. Let's hope for a favourable response 💕🌹💕

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    4. Vicki, I heard back from Nina and she says it is not her technique. So, all credit to You - I've taken pics and I like your raised bead method Much better than the one I did.
      Hugs

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    5. Thanks for checking with Nina.

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  5. Interesting post, we tatters learn something new from you from every post, no matter how long we have been tatting.

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    1. It is mutual, dear Margaret - the tatting community has so much to offer that I find myself lagging behind :-)))

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  6. Very interesting how many techniques there are in just a few moves. ;)
    I see your butterfly, but also 2 hearts if you separate them and turn them the other way(upright). ;)

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    1. Yay, yes, I see the hearts now!!! Thanks Sue :-D
      The actual permutations and combinations of LJ and the 3 movements, along with RW, TW, direct tatting, and SS create a large playground for us to play in ;-P And then beads, as Vicki suggested - wow!

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  7. As a total beginner I look at peoples work and WONDER Your Blogg is incredibly informative, I so apprecite the effort you put into your explanations. Things are beginning to make sense now.

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    1. Welcome to my blog, Sharon, and thanks for the sweet words :-))) Never fear to ask at any time, and happy tatting!

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  8. I'm really pleased that you have mentioned Elaine P. Gan's 'reverse join' as an extension of the lock join. We've discussed it on Craftree for years.

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    1. Thanks, Judith 🌹 Yes, I have shared the Craftree link in the pdf.
      There are several more LJ extensions coming up, which you would easily guess.

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  9. Just catching up with my reading. Wow! what a fascinating collection of techniques in this post! I just read the post and downloaded the pdfs for later, but I learned so much just from your overview! Thank you so much for sharing this!

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    1. I always enjoy and appreciate your comments, Emily :-D Glad you found this helpful.

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  10. Oh, and I do see the butterfly layout. In fact I kept having to look twice reading the post to be sure it was indeed separate motifs! 😁

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    1. It is fun to play with arrangement of motifs - never know what may turn up! And I noticed the butterfly only After looking at the pic, Emily ;-P

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