Friday, 29 June 2018

Mock Rings 2 LJ mock onion rings

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Continuing from the last post … I’d like to point out that the categorisation I have adopted is not watertight. This is the closest I could get to organising the various types/styles of mock rings in an orderly fashion, choosing one main feature for grouping so that it becomes easy to remember and recall. Along with the similarity it highlights the slight variations.

Lock Join - Mock Onion Rings 

In previous segment the chain was converted into a ring by joining to picot(s) on a previous row. Now we move closer home with the join coming at the ‘base of the ring’. Here the ‘base of a ring’ refers to the bare thread between rings in a previous row or to a previous element.
When the chain is very close to the ring edge, it creates the impression of an onion ring. 

Traditionally an onion ring is made of usually 2 true rings encircling the previous one in flat layers - all starting and ending at a common point. However, if the layer(s) is worked as a chain, it becomes a mock onion ring.

2C. Lock Join: to bare thread between rings in previous row

In this variation, the join is made to bare thread between rings in a previous round. These chains give an effect of another ring encircling the earlier ring – a ‘rudimentary' mock onion ring.
The Shamrock Leaf in above collage is made in 2 continuous rounds. The medallion of 3 free rings is made first, leaving a bit of bare thread space between each. These are true rings.
An outer chain round is then added. Each chain is lock joined to the bare thread between rings, giving the impression of onion rings.

[ Reference for section 2C is from the Craftree thread: Are these very old onion rings?. It refers to a pattern on p.28 of The Ladies’ Worktable (1871, March 4). ]


2D. Lock Join: to bare thread/base of previous element 


In onion rings, with each additional layer, the size of ring increases and a large ring is difficult to close. So, instead of true rings, the outer layers are worked as chains in both needle and shuttle tatting. Each chain layer is lock joined to the space at the beginning of that layer. It now resembles a ring.
In the above collage, the 2 inner cream rings are true rings followed by a chain using ball thread. After encircling the rings, the chain is lock joined to the tiny space between two layers. We can continue to add more layers in similar manner.
In the Dancing Peacocks medallions, only the innermost ring is true. Switching between 2 shuttles with different threads provided alternating colours.

In the lead pic, the mock onion ring on the left is made with twin true rings, followed by 2 mock ring layers or chains joined back around. 

[ For more details on onion rings and mock onion rings - Types of Rings by Judith Connors
(free sign in to Craftree to access document) ]

This concludes Category 2 - Mock rings made with lock join. Even though lock join is an essential feature of the next set of mock rings, the 3rd category will focus on linking to a picot at the start/base of the chain itself. 

....to be continued

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13 comments:

  1. I love this, I have do the two rings many times and feel comfortable with it when making up a pattern or when I do use it on the mock rings I make more double stitches than they call for. For some reason I guess I pull the rings too tight. the second one never fits nice. the bit of space on the shamrocks it important to remember, good tip.

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    1. I'm in the same boat, Carollyn! I usually have to add a stitch or two to the 2nd and 3rd rings. Hence a chain is so much better than a true ring - easy to adjust and to retrotat if required.

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  2. I still struggle with onion rings, so if mock onion rings are possible, I'm all for it. The onion on the first picture looks very oniony, especially with the tiny roots at the top, very cute!
    The bare thread makes the shamrock look a lot neater with the extra layer. Thank you again for sharing this series!

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    1. Lavi, I find mock onion rings more efficient, with the advantage of using colours as per discretion.
      It does look like an onion, now that you mention it ;-P

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  3. I like the shape the lock join gives in the first pic, lock joins sometimes seem a poor relation of Catherine wheel joins and other fancy joins, but the have their own virtues.

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    1. We might be able to do away with most fancy joins, including CWJ, but lock join is an essential component of basic tatting. We definitely cannot ignore it, Jane!

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  4. Thank you:)
    I will use the pattern in the next lesson

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    1. I am honoured yet again, Renata :-) I am keeping track of the tasks, and enjoying the lovely projects put up and the challenging tasks.

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  5. Very interesting learning!!! :)
    I Love your Dancing Peacock medallions!!!!!!! :)

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    1. Sue, pattern for the medallions will be shared along with the round robin doily - I used this as the center for mine.

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  6. Next very interesting 'lesson' :) Thank you:)

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    1. Thanks for patiently following along, Anetta :-) One last category to go - perhaps 2 posts.

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  7. Its unbelievable the way you are creating magic. Want this pattern in my diamond ring.

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