Saturday, 14 December 2019

Gotham Towers

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Snowflake #22 in Land of Laces’ 25 Snowflake Project

Taking in view the majority opinion in previous post, this is the 3rd round added to the snowflake. Since it has numerous possibilities (time is running out, & I am involved in helping out friends ;-P), I am counting it as #22, with 3 more to go. 

ConcentriCITY Towers snowflake
pattern
For some reason I was just not into this round – I hated my tatting, the curves in the chains were not sitting right, so many options kept invading my head, and I just slogged through somehow. I was almost on the verge of calling the 25 snowflake project over. After blocking it, though, I am fairly satisfied, and want to continue on.

Rounds 1 & 2 remain the same as shared here.
The only difference is the small ring at the tips is (3-3) instead of 5ds.

Since one tatter preferred written instructions, here is the entire written pattern. Choose your favourite method for making onion rings, pointed or angular chains, & joining 2 picots together. If required, adjust the stitch count so that the concentric rings & chains lay niched.

Abbreviation/Notation :
OR = onion ring ; -/p = picot ; + = join ; RW = reverse work ; Ch = chain ; -- = long picot ; 
SS = switch shuttle ; rs = reverse (unflipped) stitch - optional ; ^ = dot picot with Only 1 first half stitch (not 1ds) - optional ; 1SCMR = self closing mock ring made of 1 stitch.

Round 1 : ball and shuttle, continuous thread
OR1: 6 – 6.
OR2: 7 – 3 +, p 3 – 7. RW
Ch :  2 –– 8 – 8 –– 2. RW
This forms motif#1. Repeat 5 more times, joining each new OR2 to that of previous motif, and also the last to the first.
Note : None of the chain picots is joined. They all remain free.

Round 2 : 2 shuttles, continuous thread. Refer pictorial here .
Attach thread to BOTH picots on adjacent chains of previous round. I joined them simultaneously, but you can choose your own method, keeping it consistent throughout. See Eliz Davis’ study
 
Ch : 2 –– 6 lock join
OR1: 6 – 6.
OR2: 9 + p 9.
Ch : 12 + SS mock picot R: 3 – 3. mock picot SS, 12, lock join
Ch : 6 – 2, lock join through Both picots.
This forms motif #1. Repeat 5 more times.

Round 3 - TOWERS : 2 shuttles, continuous thread.

Attach thread to the outside of any onion ring formation, and continue around the triple onion ring.
The ‘towers’ are made of curved chains where I used reverse or unflipped stitches. To avoid this, you can RW, and switch shuttle.
You can choose your favourite method to make the points. There are numerous options, including a seed bead, which I have listed at the end of the post.
To create the point at the top, I made 1ds SCMR, and the points at the side are made with 1 first half stitch dot picot. 
  
Ch : 14, lock join, 5rs, SS, ^ , SS, 7, 1SCMR, 7, SS, ^ , RW 5, SS, lock join on other side of        OR ,
Ch : 8, lock join through Both picots,
Ring: 5.
Ch : 3rs, SS ^ , SS, 5, 1SCMR, 5, SS, ^ , RW 3, SS, lock join on other side ring, and again          through both picots.
Ch : 8, lock join
This forms motif #1. Repeat 5 more times.
Block into shape.

NOTE : I found that when I made the ^ on the right side and continued with unflipped stitches, there was a tendency for that point to get sucked in. You may notice it on some of the spears. My solution : Make the ^. Then reverse work. Leave a loop of core thread as if you were tatting a SCMR. Work the 3 or 5 stitches, and only snug the chain. This keeps the point intact.
I really should’ve used another method to change the curves of the chain, and I did try a couple, but somehow settled for this finally. Not happy with my work.

In Anchor Pearl cotton size 8, this measures 4”. Side of hexagon is 2”.

FUTURE IDEAS
-         switch colours in onion rings, alternating the colours, as in block tatting.
-         use Victorian set for alternate onion rings.
-         change the tower curve from ‘spear’ to ‘trident’ (as in above trial pic)
-         padded double stitch (balanced ds) for sturdier spear chains
-         concentric chains for the towers (as in trial pic)
-         beads-          
-         Lee Buchanan gave me another idea to explore at leisure, to grow the tips as in real snowflakes.   
          

POINTED  CHAINS
A few options to make pointed chains : Scroll through for tutorial links (many are listed under different headings/sub-headings)   
-         Shoelace trick (SLT), switch shuttle or reverse work
-         Frivole’s one-stitch SCMR  
-         Jon Yusoff’s pointed chain Martha Ess’ folded ring (applied to chains)
-         Usha Shah’s dot picot (or a half stitch dot picot as in pattern, to reduce 'bulk')
-         Ninetta Caruso’s right angle
-         Daniela Mendola’s mimosa knot


28 comments:

  1. It’s magnificent! And of course it deserves to be counted as a design in its own right. Well done.

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  2. I like this 3-rounded version more than previous! You're giving your best in this 25 snowflakes project, every step in your journey is interesting, thank you for sharing patterns and lessons 🌹

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    1. It does look complete and more like a snowflake 😄
      Thanks, Ninetta, it has been a journey of learning, consolidation, and confidence. 💕🌹

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  3. ÓÓ de gyönyörű!Gratulálok!

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  4. Nagyon-nagyon szép :-) Meg fogom próbálni. Köszönöm.

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    1. Nagyon köszönöm, Jolimama 😍 Looking forward to your tatting 🌹💕

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  5. It's a fantastic design! I like the effect of the pointed chains. Thank you!

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  6. Very interesting snowflake!

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  7. Replies
    1. Hahaha, that is just tatted lace from someone who has not encountered real snow, Judith ;-D

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    2. Yet you can appreciate the intricacies of their individual designs. :-)

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    3. Thank you so much, Judith :-)))

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  8. I haven't been reading very faithfully lately so missed earlier posts on this design. The outline looks like ice crystals! I love the colors and they make me think of when the snow begins to melt and mixes with the mud. I hope you don't mind that comparison, because that often makes an ugly landscape, but it is also symbolic of your being close to the end of your challenge.
    I think this is one of my favorites of all the designs you have worked.

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    1. 'city' is part of it's name, Emily and I like your interpretation :-D
      Let's see if I can finish the last 3 in one week!

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  9. I love this and I too have been away from blogging and facebook too! Your work is great and thank you for the pattern!

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  10. A beautiful pattern. Thank you and best regards

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  11. Beautiful and original snowflakes :)

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  12. Beautiful and balanced pattern!

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    1. So will I see you tatting and blogging it, Marja/ :-)))

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  13. So much here to explore! It'll have to wait until after the mad rush next week.

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