Wednesday, 16 October 2019

false CTM Part 1

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Before the tatted rope jumped in, I had started an old doily pattern to keep my hands busy, but my mind disengaged in order to focus on pattern writing. But it, too, led to a ‘quick’ foray into ‘false CTM', something I’ve been doing a lot, in numerous situations, especially when working with 2 or more colours. I like this term recently coined by Jane McLellan.


CTM – continuous thread method, where we wind one shuttle, and thread stays continuous with the ball. Or in case of 2 shuttles,(and here, including comments), wind one shuttle, then without snipping off thread, wind the other.


We tatters prefer to start with a ring and also add new thread on a ring.
With ctm, one can start anywhere, even with a chain, with NO ends to hide. However, it works Only with single colour tatting, obviously.

False CTM is essentially the same but one of the threads is a fairly short, utilitarian length, and new thread is added at a distance. This new thread can be of same or different colour. 
It is a very convenient solution to -
  • use up threads already on shuttles
  • climb out for continuous work
  • start with a chain
  • start with 2 colours
  • add a different colour, yet work continuously
  • spot or localised treatment for mistakes
It avoids having to hide a lot of ends in a single element and allows tatter to choose a inconvenient location to add new thread/colour. 

This may not be new for most experienced tatters. For newer learners, I hope the listing will help.  

1. False ctm to climb out in continuous/one-pass tatting

1A. Mignonette and single-colour tatting :
I first remember hearing it in the Online Tatting Class with respect to mignonette. Mignonette is a single shuttle technique with tiny rings and tatters began pulling out a length of thread from their shuttle to work the few split rings required to climb out after each round, and work continuously. No more cut and tie and hide ends after each round.

1B. Multi-colour continuous tatting :
This is a doily where I used false ctm a few times, reducing the ends to hide and also tatting the next rounds continuously despite using different colours. Where possible, either the core thread or ball thread from previous round is continued, replacing only one thread to change colour.
TIP : How to add new thread to a chain is a very handy skill.


2. False ctm when starting with a chain
I always make knotless additions – tatting over tail(s), as can be seen in next examples. Follow your preferred method of starting/addition.

2A. False ctm in chain, adding to core thread, closest ring faces inwards (is to be worked with core thread). The chain will continue in same colour (mustard here), but the new core thread can be of different colour, hence rings will be in that colour. This works on a shuttle and ball pattern where the red shuttle can be a ball.


2B. False ctm in chain, adding to working thread, and closest ring is a thrown ring. Pull length from shuttle and use this for the chain stitches. 2 shuttles.


Notice and compare the position of pulled length, shuttle(s), nearest ring, etc. in 2A & 2B. It keeps the old & new shuttles in the right position to continue without the need for any SLT (shoe lace trick).

2C. False ctm in chain with starter picot
A dead end chain or one starting with a picot is best started with continuous thread. In cases where this is not possible, a false ctm is Ideal. Pull out a length to tat till we reach a point where new thread can be added and hidden easily.

But here is where and why it started - starting chain with false picot – Needleart 1921 edging #6 where I wanted a grape bunch with leaves effect. 



3. False ctm when correcting a mistake
Jane used it to correct a mistake and avoid hiding 4 ends in the same place. With a false ctm, she moved the starting knots on both threads further down, hiding ends in elements of her choice.

There are More scenarios when a false CTM is so handy! These will be in Part 2. I didn't go into too much details for each collage pic, since the main points are already covered at the start. However, if anything is confusing, please let me know what you want.


to be concluded in Part 2

18 comments:

  1. Interesting post, I will have to come back again re read it, sounds easy to do

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    1. It is Very easy, Margaret, and you may already be doing it sometimes. 🌹

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  2. Useful in a number of situations!

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    1. And more to come, Jane 😍 Thanks for the term 🌹

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  3. I use these techniques very often in many situations, great tutorial Muskaan.

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    1. Thought so, too, Bernice :-) Just thought I'd put them all in one place :-D

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  4. Your post is great points and good reminders too😀

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    1. It's always good practice to 'look' before starting any lace, Carollyn ;-D

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    1. Yup, as usual what started out as a tip, went full-blown lesson, Sue ;-D

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  6. Now that I read through your excellent post, I find I was using that method to be creative....without being able to explain it! Thank you for putting into words the actions I've been doing!

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    1. Jane McLellan's term 'false ctm' is a good start, isn't it, Mel :-D

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  7. Bluff City Tatter17 October 2019 at 23:53

    You post such useful tutorials. I'm definitely coming back to read this one again later when I have shuttles in hand.

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    1. Always glad to be of use, Bluff City Tatter :-D Have fun.

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  8. Wow, this opens so many doors of opportunity! Thank you so much for this tutorial, I can't wait to start using this technique.

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    1. Enjoy, Emily :-))) Keep the scissors and tails away ;-P

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  9. Thanks Muskaan, I have posted links to your instructions on the Tatters of Lace FB group for all those who have not found your blog before.

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    1. How exciting, Jeanne! Thank you 💖🌹💖

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