Thursday, 24 May 2018

add new thread to bare thread pattern

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While using the SCMR to add new thread Within a ring, I wondered whether we could also use it in a bare thread or single shuttle pattern. Turns out we can, though it involves a bit of a twist in the tail.

Adding new thread to bare thread pattern 
with self-closing mock ring (SCMR)


I have already described one method of adding new thread, finishing off with a SSSR (link below). This new method is yet another option – very secure; no doubling of bare threads; easy to add new colours frequently; knotless. And it can be sew-free with MTT.

1. Let’s say I’m running low on thread after these 3 rings (each is 5-5-5-5). But I still have enough to make the stitches but not enough for the core thread.

2. Load another shuttle and add fold in the new thread (I used coloured thread for clarity), bringing the tail through as shown.

3. Then leave a loop of new core thread and start working stitches with old thread like a chain. This is the start of the SCMR. Tat over new tail for a few stitches.
(see Variation below)
TIP : In case the old thread is too short to wrap around pinky, tie a scrap/helper thread at the very tip with a weaver’s knot.

4. The ‘ring’ is complete.

5. Pass shuttle through the loop to close the SCMR.

6. Now pull the new TAIL up to close the ring. Notice the pink tail has become longer.

7. Both tails are visible – new thread and old thread.

8. Insert new tail through a tapestry needle and whip stitch back towards the base of the ring. This will ensure the stability and durability of the lace.
I guess one can use the Magic Thread Trick for sew-free hiding but I like to whip stitch the tails.

9.  Next sew in the old tail, moving up the ring on the right side.

10. Pull both tails to remove any slack. Then snip off the excess length in each. 
New thread added with bare thread between the rings!
Pull and tug but the tails/rings will not unravel.



Variation

A. A variation is to tie a knot with old thread encapsulated within it, leaving bare thread space before tightening the knot.
B. Leave a loop of the new core thread and start working the SCMR. Tat over the new tail, hiding it within the first few stitches.
Close the SCMR as usual buy assing shuttle through loop and pulling the core thread taut. With the new tail already hidden, we only need to whip stitch/hide the old tail on the right side of ring.
Heather (see link below) tats over both tails thus avoiding any sewing. I prefer hiding tails in different elements/stitches to avoid bulk.

I’m not sure how much this method will help because there are already so many to choose from. However, I did not find this SCMR method/variation and having already taken pictures, I decided to go ahead and share.


For quick reference, here are links to some of the other methods to add new thread to single shuttle/bare thread/rings-only patterns (random listing):


 happy tatting always J

17 comments:

  1. I’ll have to try this to absorb it properly. Thanks for clear tutorial. I followed the links, thanks.

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    1. Jane, I think my annotated post might have even more tutorial links (I forgot to check it properly ;-P)

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  2. I'll try this, for sure. Thank you for showing us another very informative post. I usually do both Matthew Takeda’s and Edda Gualstalla's, always - not only in rings-only patterns, it depends on how much long is the tail of the thread. I love both of them.

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    1. It's great that there are so many choices one has, Nin! Thankfully, I don't do much BTS tatting ;-P

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  3. Very good explanations. I will need to revisit the second one and try it out, for some reason I can't grasp it right now. I also recently had to add new thread for my wheat bracelet turned necklace. I tatted over both ends in the new ring and wrapped the old core around a half of the first ds. I'm sure I reinvented the wheel there, but it was the first idea that sounded good.

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    1. Lavi, the 2nd option/variation is meant more for those who may have difficulty starting knotless, especially a SCMR.
      In the Craftree thread I mentioned, there is another tip on how one can make the 1st ds or 1st half stitch using both new & old threads. This secures the new tail. I'm guessing that's what you did - clever :-))

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  4. Wow, really useful method. Nice explanation :-) I like your experiments :-)

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    1. Thanks, Justyna :-))) Glad you find it useful

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  5. I love single shuttle patterns and this looks great, I feel bad I didn't think of it my self. 🧚‍♀️Thanks and pictures are great too!😃

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    1. Now that is quite the compliment, Carollyn! You just made my day ;-P I, too, learn a whole lot of tips and tweaks from you.

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  6. As usual, you have produced an excellent tutorial and reference list to alternative approaches! Thank you so much!

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    1. Oh Kathleen, thank you so much :-)) So nice to see you here!

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  7. Interesting post, will be back to re read it, lots of information to try

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  8. Well I see what you mean and I just posted a tat-a-long doily that has onion rings and I too not thrilled about the joins but maybe the variegated thread I used, I don't like the big strings that loop around and I get what you are saying!

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  9. Thanks Sue & Carollyn :-) Always nice to see something come off these experiments :-)

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