Thursday, 19 October 2017

and another

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Medallions are complete in themselves, yet lend themselves to various uses. Most commonly we see them as centers in snowflakes, doilies, etc. At other times they act as motifs joined or tiled to create larger mats, etc.
For example this …
Rosette center
by Carla

It works well as a stand-alone piece (medallion) but also great when more are joined around (as motifs) – see Carla’s model and pattern


This is one of those designs that always appeals to me. Elegant arches and offset rings. 
And the negative space in center (enclosed space) takes on a different shape depending on the number of rings - 
A triangle with 3 large rings ; a square with 4 large rings, and here a cute little flower is formed!

Tatted with 3 strands of Anchor embroidery thread for a choice of colours, although colour fidelity is missing in the photographs.


As often happens we name a  pattern 'rosette' for the visual effect, but technically this one is a medallion with an enclosed space formed by inward facing rings.

Rosette is often used in tatting literature. It represents 3 forms (each a medallion in itself) – 
  • a single ring with picots ; 
  • close outward facing rings in a circle ; 
  • a central ring with close chains lock joined to the picots (as in the famous Sitka Rose by Georgia Seitz).

A medallion is made of pattern repeats called motifs. Yet a medallion itself can become a motif in a larger pattern/design when it is repeated and joined.

I had loaded my shuttles to work Carla's larger pattern, but I discovered my Clover Wreath works well as a motif, too. So I switched to the latter and will share in next post, along with a Christmasy version.

Also relieved at finally finishing the medallion document - there is a short note on rosettes, too. It took a long time with lots and lots of tweaks, but I am finally happy with it. And in the process I have learned a great deal myself. Have sent it to Susan Fuller and will share it here after she discusses it in design class.

Many many thanks to Carla for sharing this lovely pattern  :-) 

happy tatting :-)

8 comments:

  1. This is beautiful i want to try this馃槏馃尮馃挳

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  2. Thanks Carollyn, Ninetta, & Sue ! It is a beautiful design.

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  3. Fabulous design even nicer in two colours shows the pattern off well

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    1. I agree, Margaret - contrasting colours do highlight every feature of this pattern !

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  4. Phew, terminology can be confusing alright. Congratulations on getting your document done.

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    1. ...which is why exercises such as these help me a lot, Jane. Yet there are so many grey areas to boggle the mind further :-(

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