Friday, 4 December 2015

Fringe Benefits

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Fringe  Benefits

The day Corina posted her excellent idea/tut on adding a Fringe to tatting here, I was reworking my wreath ornament pattern (to be shared soon). Yes, you guessed it, I just Had to use that technique ! But my tatting path is always strewn with thorns & broken twigs :-(



Previously, on the vine I had tatted long picots that were cut to resemble thorns/twig ends (in adjoining pic). This time I loaded beads on to the shuttle to act as berries. Being freeform, I had no idea where & when I would want to add a fringe thorn & where the bead(s). So I could not preload the fringe on the shuttle thread like Corina had done. Here’s how I adapted Corina’s Fringe for spot addition.

It is a simple 2-step technique. However, I wanted to see the effects of slight tweaks, hence there are more pics than strictly required for the adaptation. You know me ;-P

This adaptation can come in handy if one runs short of fringes or if one decides to add a fringe, a whisker, antennae, etc. midways - anywhere, anytime - into the tatting process.
This method (whether preloading or spot addition) can be used for Frayed picots too !

Abbreviations & Threads Used :
DS – double stitch
fhs – 1st half stitch
shs – 2nd half stitch
SH - shuttle
RODS – reverse order ds
FS/BS – frontside/backside tatting
I used normal Anchor 6-ply crochet cotton thread in size 20 for the tutorial & different colours for easy identification & comparison.
Yellow is SH1 or core thread ; Turquoise is SH2 or ball or chain thread ;
Mustard, Red & Blue scraps are used for fringe.

Corina's Fringe 

(a spot adaptation)
1. Cut a length of thread to use for fringe (longer than intended; trim later)
2. Bring ends through loop, ensuring that the core thread (yellow) is encapsulated.
3. The macramé knot (larks head knot) which resembles a double stitch if formed, tensioned & snugged.
 4. NOTE : Position ball/SH2 thread BETWEEN the fringe threads (like in a 'V') ...
5.  ... and then make the 1st half stitch.
This step (#4) ensures that the fringe stays secure & stable, even if it is trimmed short.
 6. Complete the 2nd half stitch (shs) & continue.
 7. The Same fringe can be made by laying the thread loop in above manner. 
Compare with pic #1
8. Fringe as seen from the back. 
Notice how it is placed between 2 half stitches, when viewed from back.
So, when working RODS (FS/BS tatting), all one needs to do is reverse the initial placement ...
9. In RODS, a stitch starts with the shs (2nd hs), hence 'reverse order'. 
BEFORE starting it, place the fringe thread in above position & continue.
10. Make knot, tension & snug.
 11. Again, position ball/SH2 thread in the 'V' of the fringe & make RODS.
12. Here, same as above, But notice placement of fringe loop. 
AND this time I positioned the loop after 1 complete DS (instead of after fhs as in pic #9). 
The knot, however, comes out the same. Continue tatting.
13. Complete tatting the stitch. 
4 fringe elements made - 2 on DS segment & 2 on RODS segment. Compare the 2 sets. 
Closely study the chain stitches (turquoise) in comparison with the fringe insertion : 
the 1st 2 mustard & the last blue one are flanked on either side by complete ds ; 
red fringe is flanked by half stitches on either side. 
14. Viewing the same from the back, again notice the chain stitches that flank the fringe.
Pics #13 &14 help us decide which arrangement & effect is preferable for the project on hand.
15. The fringe threads have been trimmed short. But they won't slip off ;-)



Many thanks to Corina for her generous sharing of the Fringe technique
& graciously permitting me to share this adaptation.

 Here's hoping this technique will not remain on the fringes of tatting !

happy tatting :-)




8 comments:

  1. Oh no you make me want to put aside what I am working on and give this a try. Great explanation of Fringe.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Bernice :-) Now, we wouldn't want any more UFOs ;-P

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  2. Love the idea. The first step was the way I started to, by the way ;) . And what a smart way to block the fringes!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Corina :-) I couldn't have done it if you hadn't shared your idea & pics !
      Not just a fringe, this is such a great idea for frayed picots, too !

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    2. Thanks, Corina :-) I couldn't have done it if you hadn't shared your idea & pics !
      Not just a fringe, this is such a great idea for frayed picots, too !

      Delete
  3. Love the idea. The first step was the way I started to, by the way ;) . And what a smart way to block the fringes!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Simple and effective, well done! It's nice not to have to think ahead.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Jane :-) Yes, that's what I like about auxiliaries & on-the-spot additions .

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